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The Last Boy Scout

Published October 31, 2021

The Last Boy Scout

I’d never even heard of this movie, and I think the title is a bit odd - it doesn’t really help you understand what you’re getting. Clearly, it was a shock and a disappointment when Halle Berry’s character was killed off just twenty minutes in, but if I’m honest, it was after that when things started to get going. The movie was very slow to start but once there was a specific crime to investigate, then it was all systems go.

Get outside

Published October 31, 2021

Get outside

It’s not the best time to get obsessed with maps and walking, given that the autumn and winter weather is starting to kick in, but I recently discovered the Get Outside section of the Ordnance Survey website. As the official mappers of the UK, they have plenty to peruse on the atlas and map side of things, but they’ve also made a big effort to encourage people to leave the comfort of four walls and a roof and make the best use of their products.

Music Box by Mariah Carey

Published October 31, 2021

Music Box by Mariah Carey

This is a really good album, featuring Mariah’s incredible vocals all the way through. I don’t always enjoy it when she goes piercingly high, but you can’t fault the range. Couple of great songs on here, the cover of Without You, and of course Hero. The problem with the latter song is that it comes second on the track list, directly after Dreamlover - and it’s a really odd juxtaposition. But having said that, where would the song fit in the album anyway? It’s such a good one (and great to really belt out while you’re driving) but not one that blends well with others.

FUTURE PAST by Duran Duran

Published October 31, 2021

FUTURE PAST by Duran Duran

This album is like no time has past and Duran Duran just dipped right back into what they do best. The only time you realise it’s a more up to date album and we aren’t actually back in the 1980s is the couple of guest stars, bonus Tove Lo! I’m not sure any of it leaps off the page and will stick in the memory as much as, for example, Rio, does, but it’s still a really fun listen from start to finish.

The Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande

Published October 31, 2021

The Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande

This is such an interesting book, and the results are incredible for something so simple. In an effort to improve conditions in hospital, the experiment was just to introduce a checklist - not just to make sure the steps are ticked off, but to encourage people to think about what they’re doing and also foster a feeling of team camaraderie. Amazing how effective it is, and with examples in the medical industry, as well as aviation and more, it’s a wonder this isn’t shouted about more often.

Survivors by Terry Nation

Published October 30, 2021

Survivors by Terry Nation

I listened to the audiobook of this novelisation by Terry Nation, having previously seen the reboot series but never the original. Apparently this book has a vastly different ending to the series anyway though, so I dived in. It was naturally quite hard to get through the virus bit, given world events of late, but once that was out the way and it really was just a post-apocalyptic story of survival, then it was interesting.

Head in the Sand by Damien Boyd

Published October 29, 2021

Head in the Sand by Damien Boyd

I read the first book in this series a while back and dipped into the second one. It’s a good mystery, very easy to read and race through, but there’s quite a lot of repetition. Our heroes will find something out and then spend a good amount of time repeating it to their bosses or colleagues, to make sure everyone’s on the same page. I just wanted to find out whodunit! Overall good though, and I’ll seek out the next one.

A Life of Crime by Harry Ognall

Published October 28, 2021

A Life of Crime by Harry Ognall

This is an odd one, another workplace memoir, this time from a life in the criminal courts. It was interesting but I don’t know if it went in depth enough. Obviously you have to be careful of the law, but it felt very light, skimming the surface of a handful of trials. I think there was also a lot of implied knowledge, I didn’t really understand the career trajectory of our narrator, thinking he was a judge before he’d actually made it, etc. Good but not perfect.

Night by Elie Wiesel

Published October 27, 2021

Night by Elie Wiesel

This is one of those short but hardhitting memoirs, that really hits home hard due to the simplicity of the narrative. It’s an incredible read, giving insight into time spent in concentration camps during World War II, and it’s just a reminder of how horrific everything was. Weisel writes with facts and emotion but somehow manages to contain the rage and emotion that it strikes in the reader. A tough but important one.

The Sound of Laughter by Peter Kay

Published October 26, 2021

The Sound of Laughter by Peter Kay

I listened to Peter Kay’s newly released audiobook of this, his autobiography from about ten years ago. It’s a great story, well told, and with all the extra bits thrown in, it really was just like sitting down and having a chat with him. I liked the moments where he ended up reviewing his own work, or adding some notes on what has happened since the book was first published. It always makes me laugh how much real life stuff ends up in the TV shows - all that supermarket stuff, some of the conversations like for like those that he had with Kayleigh in Car Share. Loved it.