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531. Predestination

Published February 20, 2015

Background info

Title: Predestination Director: The Spierig Brothers Year: 2014 Run time: 1hr 37m

“From the directors of Daybreakers, Predestination chronicles the life of a Temporal Agent (Ethan Hawke) sent on an intricate series of time-travel journeys designed to stop crimes before they are committed. Now, on his final assignment, he must pursue the one criminal that has eluded him throughout time - starring Sarah Snook and Noah Taylor.”

Live blog

3:47 - You made a time machine out of a violin case? 10:42 - Hawke makes a good bartender. 12:38 - It’s a wonder anyone meets anyone anymore, without having lighters to step in and save the day. 18:36 - That’s a little kid with a temper. 22:51 - Glasses really have come a long way from the 50s and 60s. 25:48 - Even virtual reality these days makes people throw up. 30:10 - The first time you’re not good at something, and it’s etiquette. Feeling that! 36:48 - He’s smoking in the hospital. So weird. 39:32 - A “face-shaped” face? Not useful at all. 44:38 - She’s like the spitting image of both Jodie Foster and Leonardo DiCaprio. 51:12 - “You’re not talking about bartending, are you?” 53:55 - A device that creates a temporal wake. A time machine. 55:28 - He’s in 1985?? That’s the best time travel year ever! 1:10:26 - Whenever the word bureau is used, it’s usually a bad sign. 1:13:47 - “Luck is the residue of design.” 1:21:44 - He needs to reboot that time machine. 1:26:57 - “I remember that.” So much love for time travel concepts.

Conclusions

In cinemas now? Fabulous. Time travel? Sign me up!

This was such a bizarre mixed up film that it had me thinking about it hours, even days after watching. The concept is pure genius, a chicken and egg scenario that winds itself up into some incredible knots. I loved watching it all unfold, and enjoyed the 40 minutes of storytelling at the beginning - an incredibly brave way to kick off a film.

Where the film fell down was that the idea never really went anywhere. The chicken and egg knot, once sealed, sort of imploded. At the end, you’re left thinking: what have I learned? What was the point? And there wasn’t a point. The big reveals, stunning as they were at the time, ultimately ended up that if you just took the one character away, everything would be fine.

Really good whilst watching, but ultimately deeply unsatisfying afterwards.

Rating: 2/5.

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