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437. Cuban Fury

Published June 30, 2014

Background info

Title: Cuban Fury Director: James Griffiths Year: 2014 Run time: 1hr 38m

“Beneath Bruce Garrett’s (Nick Frost) shabby, overweight exterior, the passionate beating heart of a salsa king lays dormant. Only one woman, his smart, funny and gorgeous new boss Julia, can reignite his Latin fire. But she’s way out of his league, and with expert lothario and alpha-male office nemesis Drew (Chris O’Dowd) in rampant pursuit, can Bruce’s loyal sister (Olivia Colman), childhood dance mentor (Ian McShane), and crazy new amateur salsa pal (Kayvan Novak) help Bruce unshackle his dancing beast, regain his long lost fury and claim the love of his life?”

Live blog

1:37 - “All overseen by my mentor…” …Lovejoy. 7:10 - The grumpy Welsh woman was the less grumpy Welsh one in that Paul Potts film. 10:57 - “Talk me through headbutting your new boss.” 14:43 - I like the idea of a weekly roundup, probably for a different subject though. 18:06 - Sequin-gate! 20:02 - That’s one thing records are a bit delicate for - drunken playing. MP3s more durable. 27:15 - I should go to a dance class. Fun. 31:29 - I love Chris O’Dowd, wish he wasn’t being the awful character! 33:22 - The Cassette of Death. 37:39 - Giving out your number with just a fifteen minute window is a good idea. 38:40 - I’m not really down with this record and tape business, but it’s still cute. 43:49 - “It’s not flat, it’s still.” 46:13 - Woohoo, Hill Valley reference! 50:00 - Salsa rage! 53:43 - Underhanded tape stealer. That’s so mean. 58:50 - Suddenly I have a craving to get drunk and play board games! 1:09:17 - Showdown in the car park. 1:12:28 - Think of the choreography that went into that. 1:18:27 - “Can I borrow a racquet?” Not enough Olivia Colman in this. 1:26:57 - It’s fun spotting the bits that are them and that are professional dancers.

Conclusions

We’ve had a bit of a hiatus when it comes to watching films, and I think this was the perfect title to break us back in gently. A stellar cast and a none-too-challenging concept, with several laughs along the way, and pantomime heroes and villains to cheer and boo respectively. I thought Nick Frost did a really good job with holding the film, when he’s more used to being part of a double act. (Give or take the odd cameo!) As mentioned above, I was disappointed that O’Dowd was the bad guy, but he played it very well.

There were some great cultural references in there, particularly the Back to the Future and Dirty Dancing stuff, and generally it felt like a really warm film full of heart. Or El Corazon.

Rating: 5/5

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