mrschristine.com

2015

Knowledge Encyclopedia Space! by DK

Published July 28, 2022

Knowledge Encyclopedia Space! by DK

This is a great resource book for kids and adults alike, delving into all aspects of space. There are breakdowns of each planet in our solar system as well as a view of what’s further afield. There are details about space travel, what has been discovered so far and what future missions might find. And there’s talk of the big bang, of the various types of stars, and quite a big section on constellations and looking up into the night sky. Great book to refer back to in the future.

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

Published April 27, 2022

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

I think I’ve hit the hat trick of ways to consume this story now - I saw it first on stage, then watched the movie and have now topped it off with the book that started it all. I do like to do things backwards! Again, reading this, I do think I would have found it confusing if I hadn’t already known the story, it dips back and forth in time and character, and actually the three main women are quite indistinguishable for a long period of time - damaged and dealing with difficult men. It’s a good thriller though, and worth sticking with.

Keep Moving by Dick Van Dyke

Published April 15, 2022

Keep Moving by Dick Van Dyke

What a wonderful book this is. I listened to the audiobook read by the man himself and it’s just a warm, joyous affair, filled with knowledge and love and honesty and fun. Dick dispenses his advice in a way that is completely relaxed and without judgement, whilst still telling us what he thinks is right and wrong. I particularly enjoyed the timeline of events that have happened during his lifetime so far, and his rating them with a school style A-F.

Swansong by Damien Boyd

Published January 17, 2022

Swansong by Damien Boyd

Dived straight into this one off the back of the previous book and in this outing we get a lot more information about our protagonist, Inspector Dixon. He’s got a past and it involves missing persons and boarding schools and lots of secrets. I felt like the case at the heart of the story was a bit odd, it didn’t quite feel true to life to me, but I was happy to go along with it as it was interesting to watch Dixon undercover and how he managed to deal with communicating some things and keeping other things secret. A pretty scary ending as well, a proper thrilling conclusion!

A Boy Called Christmas by Matt Haig

Published December 22, 2021

A Boy Called Christmas by Matt Haig

I read this because we watched the film, and it was exactly what I expected - a really good children’s book with some excellent illustrations. It reminded me very much of Roald Dahl in the best possible ways. The film stuck very closely to the book to start with, just a few tweaks here and there, but the ending was quite different. In the book, Nikolas well and truly becomes Father Christmas with the big beard and belly and laugh and older. In the film, he’s still a kid when he has his big idea. The book makes more sense on that front, but I say it’s worth enjoying both!

The Guilty by David Baldacci

Published December 4, 2021

The Guilty by David Baldacci

I’m really getting into David Baldacci books, the more of them that I read, but I have to admit that Will Robie has a bit of a special place in my heart because he’s the first of DB’s many series’ that I got into. This book, then, is a treat, because it gives us so much more information about Robie’s backstory, stuff that has never been revealed before. Our hero has to return to his hometown when his estranged father is arrested for murder, and of course nothing is quite what it seems and there’s a much bigger plot at work. The twist at the end was good too, I should have seen it coming but didn’t, and that made it so much more irritating/brilliant.

Back to the Future: The Ultimate Visual History by Michael Klastorin and Randal Atamaniuk

Published February 22, 2021

Back to the Future: The Ultimate Visual History by Michael Klastorin and Randal Atamaniuk

It’s taken me a long time to read this as it’s a gorgeous hardback coffee table style book, so I would just dip in and out every now and again. At the heart of it, it’s a week-by-week analysis of how the three Back to the Future films came together, from concept to shooting schedules, to release. There’s lots of great insight, behind the scenes knowledge, and it’s stacked full of great photographs I’ve never seen before.

Murder at the Lighthouse by Frances Evesham

Published December 23, 2020

Murder at the Lighthouse by Frances Evesham

It’s a serviceable murder mystery but the cast of characters was too big to get to know anyone in the short time available. And that meant it was hard to get involved properly in the whodunit, and the big reveal a bit less impactful than it otherwise could have been. But you really get a sense of the place and its three lighthouses!

The Life-Changing Magic of Not Giving a F**k by Sarah Knight

Published December 5, 2020

The Life-Changing Magic of Not Giving a F**k by Sarah Knight

This is a great read with some valuable advice on how to live your best life. It takes a while to get through all the pre-amble, the proof that it’s worth doing and selling the idea to us but once it does, you get to the good stuff.

Career of Evil by Robert Galbraith

Published August 7, 2020

Career of Evil by Robert Galbraith

It’s certainly a step change from the previous two. This time, we see inside the head of the villain and it’s not pretty viewing. There are some pretty disturbing scenes, if we’re being honest. But what everyone is here for, I assume, is the burgeoning relationship between Strike and Robin, and to unwind the mystery. Let’s talk about the latter first: it’s interesting that we have three leads to go on and for a change, they are completely separate. Rather than everyone who knew a model, or anyone who worked with a writer, these are three very separate people. That’s interesting and different.