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2010

Pictures of Lily by Paige Toon

Published August 31, 2022

Pictures of Lily by Paige Toon

I whipped through this book, it was quite a light and fluffy read. It felt a bit weird that the first half was setting up the scene of a love life for a fifteen turning sixteen year old - it all felt a bit sincere for such a young age. And then, of course, when we pop forward into the future, it’s quite obvious what’s going to happen. But I still quite enjoyed the process of reading and getting to that happy ending.

No Time Left by David Baldacci

Published October 16, 2021

No Time Left by David Baldacci

A super short read from David Baldacci and I loved it. Effectively, the great thriller writing you expect from Baldacci with just a touch of time travel thrown on top. I guess it was a bit weird how quickly our assassin protagonist adapted to his situation, but equally, the payoff was worth it. I saw it coming only moments before it happened, and it left quite an impression on me!

The Moneyless Man by Mark Boyle

Published September 27, 2021

The Moneyless Man by Mark Boyle

I sort of had to split this book into two things as I was reading - one was the memoir of what Mark did, and one was the manifesto of freeconomic living. The two elements worked very differently. As a memoir, it’s brilliant. Mark is open and honest, upfront about the challenges of living like this, about his thoughts and doubts, and experiences along the way. It’s an interesting idea and one that is worth thinking about, so raising the profile of the problems money causes is great.

Doctor Who: Code of the Krillitanes by Justin Richards

Published July 19, 2021

Doctor Who: Code of the Krillitanes by Justin Richards

I remember reading this before, and I actually blogged about it at the time. This book was released as an app, and it was one of the first reading experiences I had on a phone. As a book, I said it was fine, a bit predictable, a super quick and easy read (obviously, being part of the excellent Quick Reads initiative), not challenging but doing the job well. I pretty much agree with that although I think I enjoyed it more this time round as I was just reading the book rather than thinking about the whole app concept as well.

I Remember Nothing and other reflections by Nora Ephron

Published November 27, 2020

I Remember Nothing and other reflections by Nora Ephron

We all know by now that Nora Ephron writes wonderfully with wit and nostalgia, hope and horror in equal measure. This is a short but sweet collection of essays that take a look at Nora’s early work in journalism, dealing with trying to remember people’s names, and how divorce can affect you in very different ways.

Room by Emma Donoghue

Published March 18, 2020

Room by Emma Donoghue

I’d previously read half of this, which is annoying, because I’d never quite got to the bit where the mother and son duo escape from the room they are being held in. This book staggers me, partly because it’s such a well told story based on such an horrific crime, but also because it’s completely engaging despite being the scatty and unformed mind of a sheltered five-year-old.

The Cold War in an Hour by Rupert Colley

Published August 26, 2011

The Cold War in an Hour by Rupert Colley

Split into two parts, the first covers the story in detail - in this case, from the appearance of Stalin to the introduction of Yeltsin, via the Vietnam war, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the rise and fall of multiple presidents and prime ministers. The second half is the appendix, with a quick overview of the main characters involved in the subject, and then a great timeline for just the key facts in the order they happened.