Sharp viewing

Like many others, I recently finished watching Sharp Objects, the HBO mini series starring Amy Adams and based on the book by Gillian Flynn. I’ll be honest and admit I only watched this because it has the lovely Amy Adams in it, I didn’t particularly enjoy Gone Girl the book or the film, and whilst I did like Sharp Objects as a novel, I was worried how it would unfold on screen.

My review of the book at the time I read it (2014), included this:

I thought it was so well written, it really drew you in with evocative prose and snappy dialogue. Each paragraph made you feel exactly what those involved were feeling, particularly the sticky, prickly, sickly feeling that grew and grew towards the end.

The mini series was EXACTLY the same. It was beautifully shot, so that I could barely keep my eyes off the screen (slightly awkward when I usually multi-task my TV viewing), and I loved the flashes of scenes intercutting with each other. The way music would start and stop, loud and uncompromising, and the way even the quiet moments weren’t quiet – eery soundtracks or noisy night insects would continue the creepy feeling that emanated from the very first moment.

Amy Adams was brilliant, of course, but actually the trio of Amy, Patricia Clarkson and Eliza Scanlen were all incredible and made an absolutely captivating family (for all the wrong reasons). The story was told slowly but it was never dragged out, and you just gradually got a feeling that this town has more secrets than we will ever get to know.

There’s vague talk of a second series but I hope that never materialises. As this IndieWire review explains (spoilers in the link):

With so many principles still kickin’, a twist ending that casts the series in a whole new light, and a quality product from start to finish, a quick reaction to the finale may be to demand more. But the longer you sit with it, the more fitting this ending feels. “Sharp Objects” was told in flashes; it’s only fitting it ends with a bang.