Forming a strong Bond

Last month, Mr C and I finished watching all of the Bond films. We’d been pondering the merits and pitfalls of doing such a thing, but when I bought the iTunes bundle of all 23 films up to and including Skyfall, it was inevitable. We finished the films just in time for the hype to start for the new film, Spectre, which means there’s a lot of great Bond content on TV and the internet just as our interest has peaked.

I have a lot to say about the experience of watching all the films, my thoughts on the various actors, my misconceptions about how much I knew before diving in, and the rollercoaster of quality that occurs throughout the year. I don’t yet have time to get back to blogging properly yet, so that will have to wait, but there is a lot of good Bond content out there that it seems rude not to share.

daniel-craig-collection

Given the vast history that Bond has accumulated, it’s not a surprise that people are starting to track his activities and make charts, graphs and statistics out of all that he does. The (James) Bond Index does a great job of comparing each Bond era on the main aspects – time in and out of a suit, time spent arguing with M or being reprimanded by Q, and most importantly, number of gadgets. Brosnan does amazingly well on the gadgets front.

The Economist also came up with some numbers for their Daily Chart a while back. Poor Dalton does seem to get the raw end of the deal on a lot of these things.

Meanwhile, there was a fab programme on the BBC in which Mark Gatiss and Matthew Sweet sit and discuss their thoughts on each of the Bonds in turn, and the progression of the series through each era. Whilst I didn’t agree with everything they said, it was refreshing to have such a simple programme – two people, sitting, talking about a subject they’re clearly passionate about.

The New York Times wrote up an amazing article about the family background to the Bond brand, and how it is now safely in the hand of Barbara Broccoli. I do love Barbara, partly for her amazing name but also because she worked her way up to the top even if she did have a tiny bit of a head start.

Finally, to wrap up, I’m turning from the big screen to the page in an effort to continue my obsession with the world’s greatest (and also worst) spy. I read Roger Moore’s biography, My Word is My Bond, which was interesting enough although it amazes me how much they got away with in those days! And I’ve just started reading Casino Royale, which is pretty similar to the on screen outing. Can’t wait to see Spectre, although there have been mixed reviews, but until then, I’ll keep reading!