N is for National Space Centre

The final stop on my Alphabet mini-tour (way back in May, how did that happen?) was the National Space Centre, just outside of Leicester. I’m developing an interest in all things space travel, and I was surprised that we have a space centre, given that we have very little in the way of a space programme.

The website makes it clear that this is a destination designed for kids. At the moment, on the homepage, there’s a lego space shuttle, and three pictures of kids enjoying their day out at the centre. I was anticipating this when I went, and given my lack of any real space knowledge, I figured I’d do well to start with something aimed at the children. I was to be disappointed.

 

There wasn’t much in the Space Centre, a few sections zoned off to separate pieces about astronauts, about the solar system, and about space travel itself. It was all centred around the cinema, which would be showing some kind of film – but I am never keen on sitting and watching these things. I don’t like having to plan a visit around a specific showing time.

There were some bits I liked, the bits about astronaut life were fascinating, and I loved the stuff about previous trips to the moon. For some reason, I have never really thought about the other people that went to the moon – more than just the giant step guy. There were great videos along the way talking to astronauts about what life is like in space. The videos were good, and although interesting, they could be a bit long. It’s awkward to stand around and watch a video, perhaps missing the beginning, or jostling for position with others coming in halfway through.

 

Ultimately, I was really disappointed with the centre. There wasn’t that much to do, and having the fascinating astronaut bit nearest to the door meant the rest was something of a letdown. It was one of those places where the gift shop was more interesting than the attraction itself. I left pretty early, and made my way home, a little sad that my mini-trip had such an anti-climactic ending.

6 thoughts on “N is for National Space Centre

  1. I had no idea there was a National Space Centre. I hate when people do things like this badly. How difficult is it for them to do something interesting with all that space stuff? They have hundreds of missions to choose stuff from and they make a mess of it. How are kids supposed to get inspired by space when they put more effort into the gift shop.

    Glad you at least found out that more than one person went to the moon.

  2. That’s disappointing. Why should it be aimed only at kids, and then only fairly badly? Space is incredibly fascinating and this should be one of the most interesting centres in the country.

  3. Glad you at least found out that more than one person went to the moon.

    Hehe. I mean, I sort of knew, vaguely, many Apollo missions and all that. But there was video of lots of people bounding around on the moon and it suddenly made sense.

  4. Hehe. I mean, I sort of knew, vaguely, many Apollo missions and all that. But there was video of lots of people bounding around on the moon and it suddenly made sense.

    Apollo 11 which should really have been Apollo 5 was the first to land on the moon with the big step man and his deputy walking on the moon. Apollo 12 landed and then 13 had its problem and didn’t. After that 14, 15, 16 and 17 landed with 15 finding the genesis rock that proved the moon and Earth had once been part of the same body before it had a collision with a planet the size of Mars. This meant a lot of material was chucked into space and formed a disc round the Earth and the disc eventually became the moon. Apollos 19-20something were all cancelled as people had lost interest.

    So 12 men have walked on the moon but it would have been 14 had Apollo 13 not had its problem.

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