You can do the cube

It’s done!

And yes, I totally cheated.

My dad found this book in his attic, and it is the very same book that I used as a child. As I mentioned before, this is the book that we had sitting around the house and even with that in front of me, as a little kid I still couldn’t get the cube to work properly.

I don’t know what planet I was on as a child, because as an adult it took about five minutes from opening the book to completing the cube.

I’m happy that it’s done because it was annoying me sitting there on the desk all half-finished. I’m annoyed that I had to use the book to complete it, but equally I know that I would never be able to do it without. I messed it up so many times and only ever managed to salvage the cube back to having one side complete and some odds and ends around the rest of the colours.

Too hard.

11 thoughts on “You can do the cube

  1. I never managed to to get more than three side of the cube completed so well done. Now you need a new challenge you should try to find a Rubik clock.

  2. Mr C is sure he has a Rubik’s Clock somewhere. If he finds it, I’ll have a go.

    i can do one side… erm, you’re on your own for both faces.

  3. I was a youngish lad when the Rubik’s Cube had its heyday. Lots of us learnt to do it. Only one chap claimed he had worked it out for himself, but we did not believe it for a second, as it was the same person that faked a doctor’s letter to say he was diagnosed as going blind to try (and fail) to get off with a decidedly attractive female member of the sixth-form!

    Doing it without the book was always something that only a minute minority of mathematical whiz-kids would be able to do. It is amazing how many were sold considering that for ninety-nine-per-cent-plus of those that had cubes, solving it was impossible without also buying the solution.

    Even though the book has to be used to learn the moves, I would suggest the challenge is to go onto learning those moves well enough to be able to solve the cube within, say, a couple of minutes, without needing to check the book to do so.

  4. Even though the book has to be used to learn the moves, I would suggest the challenge is to go onto learning those moves well enough to be able to solve the cube within, say, a couple of minutes, without needing to check the book to do so.

    Interesting idea!

  5. I had a Rubiks Cube in 1981-ish. Without a book I learned to solve it in around 5 minutes using 3 basic sequences I worked out from scratch. Basically I did front face, middle slice then rear slice middle pieces finally back corners. I used is as end of day relaxation while doing an Engineering PhD. I suspect the kids who did it in under 1 minute had some much cleverer sequences fixing several areas simultaneously (not shown in the books). Recently my daughter borrowed my cube (and bought a how to book) also as relaxation. She bought me a 5×5 cube for my birthday last month. It is still sitting there pristine in it’s packing – slower brain and more to occupy it!

  6. say, a couple of minutes

    On reflection, I think this time-target is over-ambitious. I had my rose-tinted nostalgia-goggles on when I recalled being able to do it that quickly in my youth. Having re-examined my memories, if you could learn to solve the cube routinely in three or four minutes, that would be more the standard that was reasonably prevalent back in sixth-form. The main thing was being able to do it having learnt from the book.

  7. Blah! I solved my Rubik’s Cube without the aid of a book, and it was quite simple. I just merely peeled off the stickers and re-glued them so that each side was just one colour…
    :p

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