I am not a water spout

I popped outside and when I returned I found a spider had decided to join me. It perched on my shoulder, so I swiped it off, but unbeknownst to me, it had webbing attached. It clung to my leg and remained there until someone else spotted it and did the swiping for me. The spider was returned to whence it came.

I don’t mind spiders. I can’t say I am partial to having one crawl all over me but I was not as freaked out as my colleague was, and as I know many people would be.

I am curious about the after effects though. I am suddenly conscious of tickling sensations on me now, perhaps imagining there are creepy crawlies where there are not. This is a familiar feeling, after interactions with bugs, it’s not a surprise to feel a bit scratchy. I’m assuming that’s where the “makes my skin crawl” phrase comes from.

What is that about, though?

Is it a reflex to make us more aware and thus hopefully find a follow-up spider more quickly?

5 thoughts on “I am not a water spout

  1. I don’t like spiders or that tingling..
    I can’t leave a window open in my flat without getting little moths coming in. Completely harmless but I can’t stand them! Fluttering about flying into my face when I’m sleeping, one woke me last night at 2am and I spent 20 minutes trying to catch it and its ‘friend’. I was very aware of anything else that could be one..

  2. I think with fears like this, they are based on primal responses to life-threatening hazards. So I reckon that the idea of your skin crawling afterwards is a way of staying alert until the danger passes.

    As I read and write this, I get a funny tickling sensation as if I have a creepy crawly on me…

  3. Fluttering about flying into my face when I’m sleeping

    Oh yes, that is annoying! You have to turn all the lights out to have the window open.

  4. As I read and write this, I get a funny tickling sensation as if I have a creepy crawly on me…

    It’s very bizarre how that happens.

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