Everybody is watching sport on the internet

The idea with these shows is to keep them under ten minutes, so as to be a nice concise wrap up of all things media. Episode three is already a failure, but there is a bumper lot of news to get through, and we only just missed the target.

Everybody is watching sport on the internet

Today we’re talking about football on the internet, images with disclaimers, and broadband as a legal right.

Download episode

Length: 10:12

Links:

Feedback, suggestions, stories and ideas for future shows are always welcomed in the comments. This is the bare bones of the project and there is much more to come.

8 thoughts on “Everybody is watching sport on the internet

  1. That is an incredible amount of information in such a short time and yet it doesn’t seem rushed. I have no idea how you do that.

  2. I’ve posted elsewhere about streaming live football matches (I’ll paste it in below) but the England game was of course not a”brave experiment”, it was forced on them as no UK TV broadcaster wanted to cough up what the Ukraine FA were asking for what was essentially a dead rubber (to England, anyway – Ukraine still needed the victory).

    I still think streaming games should be an option alongside regular TV coverage but the furore surrounding this event has just made me realise how far behind us the mainstream is. That said, just look at the NFL’s offering:

    http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/4975/watch-nfl-sunday-night-football-on-your-pc/

    That’s what we want; a choice of matches, camera angles and commentary.

    Oh, and live UK TV just got easier – try: http://tvguide.co.uk/tv_channel_streams.asp

  3. (This is my original user case for ‘illegally’ streaming football matches)

    OK. I would like to see Arsenal play Birmingham at 3pm on Saturday. The match is not being televised in the UK. Would one of the brilliant minds at The FA and Premier League like to tell me why I shouldn’t be able watch the match if it is being televised in another country? Who am I hurting?

    a) Arsenal? No, the match was sold out months ago so I couldn’t pay to get in.

    b) Sky/ESPN? No, they are not showing the live game so my subscription(s) would not cover it.

    c) The broadcasters in the other countries? No, I wouldn’t be able to subscribe to their TV output as I am in a different region.

    d) The fans who paid to go to the game? No – unless they would like to swap their ticket for my live stream, which I would gladly do.

    So please tell me just exactly what I am doing wrong?

    Or, as suggested, the FA/Premier League set up a not-overpriced subscription service whereby we get good quality streams with (English) commentary, reliable contention ratios and a wide choice of live matches.

    Or someone else will.

  4. Would one of the brilliant minds at The FA and Premier League like to tell me why I shouldn’t be able watch the match if it is being televised in another country? Who am I hurting?

    Whilst I agree with this, I always understood the argument was not that broadcasting the 3pm matches would hurt the Premier League, as it probably wouldn’t, but that it would damage attendance at lower/non-league games, on the basis that if people can watch the big names on TV, they won’t go to local matches. I don’t know how accurate this idea is.

    I suspect that, at the moment, online streaming deals would have less impact than allowing Sky to show the matches, but I also expect that in a few years that won’t be the case, as people get more accustomed to watching online. It wouldn’t take much for this to be set up – most of the gambling sites would snap the hands off the EPL to get the rights to this, and they have the infrastucture in place already.

  5. …if people can watch the big names on TV, they won’t go to local matches.

    I’m glad you mentioned that; others have previously made the same argument. To my mind, it’s not really an issue. People don’t go to see Leyton Orient because they can’t see Manchester United; they go because they support Leyton Orient. The fact that they could suddenly have their pick of Man U v Chelsea, Arsenal v Spurs, Villa v Everton on the TV/internet won’t stop them being a Leyton Orient supporter. And I think the vast majority of supporters would rather go and see their games live if they could.

    However, a spin-off from your original thought could be that no match is televised/streamed unless it is sold out (or at least 80% full, or some other level to be decided). This would force clubs to put ticket prices at a reasonable level, as they would get no broadcast revenue money unless the match was well-attended.

    Another interesting reason given for the falling attendances in the lower leagues is that there are a plethora of other things to do in our weekend free time (shopping, DIY, kids clubs, etc) which was not necessarily the case 50 years ago, and everyone therefore “went to the match”.

    Sorry, meandered off topic a bit there. I’ve got loads more, but this isn’t a Future Sport Change forum!

  6. Sorry, meandered off topic a bit there. I’ve got loads more, but this isn’t a Future Sport Change forum!

    Hehe, no worries. Happy to hear your views. We also welcome guest posts 😉

Comments are closed.